March 1, 2011

Security Alert: DroidDream Malware Found in Official Android Market

Looking for more information on mobile threats like DroidDream? Check out Lookout’s Top Threats resource.

Update: Apps released under the developer names “Kingmall2010″, “we20090202″, and  “Myournet” contain DroidDream and have been suspended from the official Android Market. To date, more than 50 applications have been found to be infected with  DroidDream. See below for the full list of apps.

Update: We originally reported that Google removed the apps from devices, but we recently learned that the remote removal system has not yet been engaged for these applications because they are under active investigation.

Update: We’ve deployed an over-the-air update that protects Lookout users from all known instances of DroidDream.

The Threat

Multiple applications available in the Official Android Market were found to contain malware which could compromise a significant amount of personal data. More than 50 applications have been found to be infected with a new type of Android malware called DroidDream.

Google has already removed all of the apps known to be infected from the Android Market. As Lookout continues to find more malicious applications we will keep you updated.

Lompolo, a user on the popular news aggregation site Reddit, discovered the first instances of this malware after noticing that the developer of one of the malicious applications had posted pirated versions of legitimate apps under the developer name “Myournet.”  In addition to that developer, the Lookout Security Team identified a large number of additional apps from other developers that also contain the DroidDream malware. We’re actively working directly with Google to get these apps removed and will post updates as soon as they are available.

Lompolo analyzed two suspicious applications and found that they contain exploit code that can break out of Android’s application security sandbox.  A blogger at Android Police took a closer look at the malicious applications and verified that they do indeed contain exploit code that can root a user’s device as well code that  can send sensitive information (IMEI and IMSI) from the phone to a remote server.  Android Police also found that there is another APK hidden inside the code, which can steal additional sensitive data.

Lookout will continue to monitor this as more details unfold.  Stay tuned for further updates on this malware.

Who is affected?
Anyone who has downloaded the apps listed above may be affected. If you have downloaded these apps, contact us at support-at-lookout.com.

Full list of infected applications published by “Myournet”:

  • Falling Down
  • Super Guitar Solo
  • Super History Eraser
  • Photo Editor
  • Super Ringtone Maker
  • Super Sex Positions
  • Hot Sexy Videos
  • Chess
  • 下坠滚球_Falldown
  • Hilton Sex Sound
  • Screaming Sexy Japanese Girls
  • Falling Ball Dodge
  • Scientific Calculator
  • Dice Roller
  • 躲避弹球
  • Advanced Currency Converter
  • App Uninstaller
  • 几何战机_PewPew
  • Funny Paint
  • Spider Man
  • 蜘蛛侠

Full list of infected applications published by “Kingmall2010”:

  • Bowling Time
  • Advanced Barcode Scanner
  • Supre Bluetooth Transfer
  • Task Killer Pro
  • Music Box
  • Sexy Girls: Japanese
  • Sexy Legs
  • Advanced File Manager
  • Magic Strobe Light
  • 致命绝色美腿
  • 墨水坦克Panzer Panic
  • 裸奔先生Mr. Runner
  • 软件强力卸载
  • Advanced App to SD
  • Super Stopwatch & Timer
  • Advanced Compass Leveler
  • Best password safe
  • 掷骰子
  • 多彩绘画

Full list of infected apps under the developer name “we20090202”:

  • Finger Race
  • Piano
  • Bubble Shoot
  • Advanced Sound Manager
  • Magic Hypnotic Spiral
  • Funny Face
  • Color Blindness Test
  • Tie a Tie
  • Quick Notes
  • Basketball Shot Now
  • Quick Delete Contacts
  • Omok Five in a Row
  • Super Sexy Ringtones
  • 大家来找茬
  • 桌上曲棍球
  • 投篮高手
77 comments
  1. Johnnie Dickerson says:

    I agree totally, because that can be the root of all evil. (The jumpstart).

  2. Nielubie says:

    So any news on what the exploit actually did? Did it steal information from emails, user/passwords? I had the Chess application installed for about a month and its gone today so it looks like they uninstalled it for me.

    • alicia says:

      @Nielubie we are in the process of pulling together a technical teardown with further details. Stay posted as we know more.

  3. Nina says:

    Please also scrutinize programs which are created to integrate Twitter and other SM- I have spent the past 2 weeks attempting to rid my accounts, phone and computer from continued cross contaminatination due to malware which entered through a program posing as a Twitter app which I purchased through the Market. I am thankful for you! And will be purchasing the Lookout Pro as I have had no problems since I installed your software on my Android system. I cannot afford more wasted time or data -and I feel safer now.

    Best
    Nina

  4. Greg says:

    Why didn’t lookout protect my device. My Droid was infected by one of these apps, I had Lookout on it and it did not protect it!!!!!

    • alicia says:

      @Greg, Understand your situation. Our support team is available to work with you, please reach out to them at support@mylookout[dot]com. As of last night, all Lookout users are automatically protected from DroidDream malware.

  5. Ragflan says:

    I’m glad I bought a premium subscription to Lookout just a few days ago. Thanks for the great job on reporting this well and protecting users automatically.

  6. PP says:

    Hi,

    looks pretty scary that there are malware even in the Android Market. But good that there are people that are watching the AM more carefully than Google itself.

    So I was about to install your Lookout app from the AM, but then I looked at the list of privileges your application needs:

    This application has access to the following:

    * Your accounts:
    manage the accounts list
    * Hardware controls:
    change your audio settings
    * Your location:
    coarse (network-based) location,
    fine (GPS) location
    * Your messages:
    read SMS or MMS,
    receive SMS,
    edit SMS or MMS
    * Network communication:
    full Internet access
    * Your personal information:
    read contact data,
    read sensitive log data,
    add or modify calendar events and send email to guests,
    write contact data,
    read Browser’s history and bookmarks,
    write Browser’s history and bookmarks,
    read user defined dictionary
    * Phone calls:
    read phone state and identity
    * Storage:
    modify/delete USB storage contents modify/delete SD card contents
    * System tools:
    make application always run,
    prevent device from sleeping,
    modify global system settings,
    write sync settings,
    disable keylock,
    delete all application cache data
    * Your accounts:
    discover known accounts
    * Hardware controls:
    control vibrator,
    control flashlight
    * Network communication:
    view network state,
    receive data from Internet
    * Your personal information:
    write to user defined dictionary
    * System tools:
    automatically start at boot,
    read sync settings,
    kill background processes

    A loooong list… f.ex. why your application needs to “read SMS or MMS, receive SMS, edit SMS or MMS”? Or all the other things? This sounds more scary than the malware you warned us about… :/

    • alicia says:

      @PP We have a page dedicated to explaining our permissions. Please feel free to visit that page to better understand why need access to certain permissions. blog.mylookout.com/permissions

  7. YO SON says:

    I’m so happy I don’t pay for this service since it never would have protected my Droid if someone else didn’t find these issues. Proactivity please.

  8. Thomas Werle says:

    The “Photo Editor” App is in the Samsung Apps on the Samsung Galaxy S I9000 (for example) still interated! Is the “Video Editor” also affected?

    Kind regrads,

    Thomass

    • alicia says:

      @Thomas if you downloaded a version of the “photo editor” from the Myournet developer, then you may be infected. If the app was already on your device that you are okay. Please contact our support team if you have any other questions. support@mylookout[dot]com.

  9. Ciro says:

    Kevin, Thanks for the information and a general thanks to all the Lookout engineers for providing such a great product and being a pioneer in the Android security space and system protection technology for Android users.

  10. Glenn Berkshier says:

    Isn’t there any kind of process with Android Market to check these apps for malware before they’re uploaded? Seems stupid to just allow them to go out there without any security testing.

    • alicia says:

      @Glenn Google takes security very seriously and has a robust security model. In situations like this one, the important thing is to respond quickly and address user issues.

  11. Jon says:

    Thank you. I just have a couple of questions — which may also be of interest to others — if you do not mind.

    1) Will Lookout only detect the malware if it is still installed or also the damage even if the app has been uninstalled?

    2) Is there any distinction between the free and paid versions of Lookout in terms of the protection they offer against this malware?

    • alicia says:

      @Jon Lookout will detect malware if it is on your device, and will uninstall it. To check if your device is infected, run a Lookout security scan. Our team is looking into what remains on the phone after the DroidDream malware has been uninstalled. We’ll keep posted as we learn more. There is NO distinction between Lookout users on free or paid – every Lookout user gets the same protection against malware.

  12. Munky says:

    So basically this went down like this. 3 bad users post apps. Hundreds of thousands of downloads happen. A blogger finds them and does the hard work. Lookout sees their post and starts blacklisting app names. Shouldn’t the lookout “security team” be the ones finding these? Lookout was “scanning” these apps and passing them.

  13. Andrew says:

    What is the version/release number of the lookout update with the protection for this? I just want to make sure I have it.

    • julie says:

      @ Andrew If you have any Lookout version that is 5.0 and above, you are automatically protected. To see what version you have, go into the Lookout app, hit “menu”, then click “about” and scroll down to see the Lookout version.

  14. Jeff says:

    I don’t *think* I’ve downloaded any of the affected apps and I know that I don’t have any of them on my device right now. I recently downloaded something that I think was FallDown Classic but it may have been “Falling Down,” which is on the list. I played it for five minutes and then uninstalled it. This was about two weeks ago. I have since run several Lookout scans and everything seems to be coming up clean. Is it safe to assume that Lookout would detect any issues that could have been left behind if I had indeed downloaded one of the malicious apps?

    Thanks.

  15. Rob M says:

    Referred here via Kasperksy’s Threatpost. Very pleasantly surprised to see Lookout as the researcher! I’ve had your app on my Droid2 since I got it. I will be upgrading to full, and buying a drink for the friend who recommended it…

  16. Edward Burke says:

    Mobile security concerns and answers!
    Knowing what people you care about like your children, your parents, and your spouse are is becoming a bigger concern for many people, especially when it comes to mobile phone security. The internet has created an enormous place where thing can happen that you may have no control over.
    This is why a lot of people like to know who their kids are texting, chatting with or what kind of stuff they are surfing online, using their phone. And it may be for no other reason than a safety issues?
    And what about all the social stuff like Facebook and Twitter? Many parents would really like to keep a handle on that typre of internet use by their kids and now thy can!
    With new security software people can know everything done over their cell phones. They can track what their children do, what their spouse does and what their employees are doing if they provided them with the phone.
    How do you know what your en employees are doing? Maybe there surfing the net, maybe there going on face book or twitter when they should be working? Maybe there downloading or watching videos on company time?
    Some mobile security plans include SMSD tracking which lets you see every word of every message sent and received. They have other features like “call tracking” which has access to the number call are from and too, the length of the call and what time the call took place.
    Some offer phone book access which allows you to see every number registered on the memory of the phone. GPS locator tracking can be another feature they provide. This will show you exactly where the person using the phone is, so you know when they call there’s no making up stories or lying about being stuck in traffic.
    This kind of mobile security also offers an added protection for using the phone to do online banking or buying something online using credit cards, as you are able to monitor where the calls come from and go. All in all, having the capability to track, these concerns are not for everyone but the craziness of the internet and access to it is becoming a bigger concern for many people.

    So how does this kind of mobile security really work? Well, they create an application which monitors and records all activity done on any cell you own. It is usually stored on a server somewhere and the software gives you total access to that server.
    It’s all done over the internet so all you need to do is install the software on your computer and you can access the server from any computer, anywhere. There is nothing to install on the phone itself, software is only installed on your computer
    What’s great about this is that the cell phone needs to have internet access, which is the most unsecure access for any cell phone, to work. If you don’t have internet access on the phones you use it will not work.
    Will they know their phone is being tracked? No, once the software is installed it’s completely undetectable and it will work on almost every smart phone made even blackberry models.
    How many phones can be tracked? One account can track as many phones as you want, so there no need for multiple accounts, even if there were 100 phones, one account is all you would need. That’s perfect for a business with multiple phones or your average household.
    Who is this kind of service made for? Well if have suspicions about a spouse, a child or a workers, this is for you. If trust is a problem, it’s for you. If you want to keep tabs on your child, because of safety concerns, it’s perfect or if you have questions about a spouses whereabouts.
    All of these may seem like you’re just trying to spy on someone but knowing they were bout of children, whether your spouse if faithful or if an employee is trying to get over on you are all alginate concerns.
    It depends on each person what reason they would have to use this type of mobile security but some of the most common uses are married and single people use it to find out if their spouses or fiancés.
    Parents use it to keep an eye on their children or on their old parents. Employers and company owners use it to protect their businesses.

  17. Jon says:

    @Alicia There seems to be a typo in your 10:30 am reply so I wanted to clarify. Did you mean that Lookout will *not* detect damage? In other words, if I installed the malware app before Lookout was updated (i.e., did not flag it as malware at installation) and deleted it before Lookout was updated — or after it was updated but before the next scheduled scan, I could have an ongoing problem even though the Lookout scan I did this morning came up clean, correct?

    If so, do I have any recourse short of the fairly extreme ones (wipe or even exchange device) being suggested elsewhere? By any chance, does Lookout log all apps ever installed on my phone? Is so, how can I get access to this list to see if any identified malware is on my list?

    Thank you.

  18. Amsterdammer says:

    Hey LOOKOUT, answer this comment from another person, please:

    (copy/paste:)
    So I was about to install your Lookout app from the AM, but then I looked at the list of privileges your application needs:

    This application has access to the following:

    * Your accounts:
    manage the accounts list
    * Hardware controls:
    change your audio settings
    * Your location:
    coarse (network-based) location,
    fine (GPS) location
    * Your messages:
    read SMS or MMS,
    receive SMS,
    edit SMS or MMS
    * Network communication:
    full Internet access
    * Your personal information:
    read contact data,
    read sensitive log data,
    add or modify calendar events and send email to guests,
    write contact data,
    read Browser’s history and bookmarks,
    write Browser’s history and bookmarks,
    read user defined dictionary
    * Phone calls:
    read phone state and identity
    * Storage:
    modify/delete USB storage contents modify/delete SD card contents
    * System tools:
    make application always run,
    prevent device from sleeping,
    modify global system settings,
    write sync settings,
    disable keylock,
    delete all application cache data
    * Your accounts:
    discover known accounts
    * Hardware controls:
    control vibrator,
    control flashlight
    * Network communication:
    view network state,
    receive data from Internet
    * Your personal information:
    write to user defined dictionary
    * System tools:
    automatically start at boot,
    read sync settings,
    kill background processes

    A loooong list… f.ex. why your application needs to “read SMS or MMS, receive SMS, edit SMS or MMS”? Or all the other things? This sounds more scary than the malware you warned us about… :/

  19. Roger Wilco says:

    @Alicia: so if I have lookout scan my phone it will tell me if it’s infected, even when I uninstalled the malicious app in the past already? Will it detect the remote code those apps were able to download?

    Due to the uninstallation I don’t know if it was a clean or evil app version of chess which I once downloaded.

  20. sutan says:

    that is one of the reason y google acquire zynamics. It is a starting point for google to start do analyst whenever new apps is publish by developer.

  21. PP says:

    Thanks for the info, Alicia. I will give it a try on my mobile. :)

  22. ralla says:

    @ALICIA Will Lookout identify the malware, even if it was installed after the malware?

    • alicia says:

      @Ralla, yes Lookout will identify the malware even if you’ve downloaded Lookout after the fact. Run a Lookout security scan on your phone and it will notify you if DroidDream was installed on your phone.

  23. Brenda says:

    if it roots your device shouldn’t you be able to tell? I think I might have downloaded one of the apps, Super Stopwatch & Timer, a month or so ago played with it but didn’t keep it…so what do I do now?

  24. Greg K. says:

    Just downloaded LookOut, thanks to LifeHacker. I love that it says “Everything is OK.” Good psychology, guys.

  25. RALLA says:

    @ALICIA Thank you very much for this good piece of information. I was in doubt whether lookout is able to identify droiddream or just the malicious apps from the market.

  26. Adrian says:

    Would Lookout find the malware even after the backdoor even after the application that put it there was unistalled??

  27. Scott says:

    Interesting Experiment:

    I have an Archos 70IT with access to both Google Market and Archos’ proprietary market. I noted that Kimgmall2010’s ‘Advanced Barcode Scanner’ is still available for download on Archos’ market (charming). I have been running AVG on the device since I got it. Since I sideload a lot of apps, and have decided to perform a total wipe and reload anyway, I thought it would be interesting to install lookout and attempt to install the infected app.

    Beforehand, I made sure that AVG was up-to-date, I also installed the latest version of Lookout (nice looking app, btw). I performed a complete system scan with both AVG and Lookout. All good. I then attempted the install the infected ‘Advanced Barcode Scanner’ from Kingmall2010. Interestingly AVG intereceded on the installation (prior to Lookout getting a shot at it, I assume…). Very nice.

    I’m still going to proceed with the complete wipe, but this little experiment was very informative – It’s nice to know that reliable security apps seem to be doing their job, and that application distribution sites are not.

  28. Jay says:

    Does lookout detect if DroidDream is still active even after the infected applications have been uninstalled?

    • Amy says:

      @Jay, thanks for your email. Lookout will detect if your phone is infected and notify you-even if you previously uninstalled the DroidDream applications. If you have any other questions, please feel free to contact our support team at: support@mylookout[dot]com.

  29. MadOlivierMax says:

    Tie a Tie is always on market… :-/

  30. Lee Cary says:

    Ive been using Lookout,free version,on each & every Android powered device ive ever owned,rooted,flashed for use on Cricket, or just set up. I use it on my Sprint Evo,my girls Verizon HTC Incredible,& my brothers LG Optimus.My Evo is rooted,tried a “Senseless” Gingerbread rom that functioned rather well,but i like Sense too much,especially on Android.No matter what Android device,whether its stock,or rooted with a custom rom,& kernel.Lookout will keep it safe,just install it & set it to auto-update OTA,& check for manual updates every now & again & i set it to scan daily. Lookout will keep ur device safe & secure. It hasnt let me down yet & ive been using it as long as ive been using Android devices. Ive tried others,but always go back to Lookout. Great app.

  31. Joe says:

    Hi, I think I may have downloaded the Spider Man app. I uninstalled it last night, then downloaded lookout and performed a scan. It scanned my apps and said that I was clean, but is this only because I had uninstalled Spider Man prior to downloading lookout? Can lookout tell if my phone was infected even if the offending app is no longer present?

  32. Jose says:

    Hi!. I´ve seen I have one of the apps of the list installed in my phone: Quick Notes, but Lookout does not report any malware when scan is done.
    It has been said too that those apps are removed already fron the market, but Quick Notes still remains there.
    Indeed, I have done a random search and some of the apps reported are still there, for instance “piano” scientific calculator”…
    Please, could you comment about these points?
    Thanks for your work!

    • Amy says:

      @Jose, thanks for reaching out. The malware called “Quick Notes” was published under the name “we20090202″. If the publisher name (developer) of the Quick Notes application is different, then you are most likely safe.

  33. Bob says:

    Is there a full list of the threats which LOOKOUT will catch? Is it necessary to have other AV or AM software like AVG as well as LOOKOUT? Thanks.

  34. Bob says:

    I also wonder what load LOOKOUT puts on phone resources (speed, freezing) / battery life?

  35. Luis R says:

    Are these sending random text messages to personal contacts or just silent texts?

  36. Giorgio Di Angelo says:

    Hi I have installed lookout and purchased the premium on day 3 on my phone HTC Evo and now that 18 members of my family and friends changed from iPhone and blackberry to Android phone all of them purchased the premium lookout I really believe is a must for your Android phone. Thanks Loukout I am protected

  37. MARY says:

    Curious which Task killer pro was infected. My icon looks like a red circle with a white x in the middle.I un-installed and ran lookout, however the scan result was “no infections found” everything is ok. I’m still worried ^^;

  38. Zarraza says:

    @PP the “2 second read” of why lookout needs access to all of the above is because it’s more than just virus/malware protection – it will also help you locate a lost device and does other stuff that I probably don’t know about –

    I installed it because of the fear of losing my device, but in the grand scheme of things, I guess I’m glad it’s been on there since I got my phone!

  39. Susan says:

    Thanks Lookout for the DL on the Rogue apps. In response to PP above, I have had Lookout since I bought my android 2 yrs ago, in their defense, they need access to all those things you listed BC they have a backup option. I have all my text, photos, apps, ringtone, calls, contacts EVERYTHING backed up in the event lets say I drop my phone in water…which I have done. This way I will not lose ANYTHING!!!

    FYI, love the scream feature that comes with Lookout as I miss place my phone often in my home …

  40. paskuniag says:

    Thanks for actually publishing the names of the intrusive malware apps, which is more than Google did when they first made the announcement, so far as I know. They didn’t, however, uninstall the app that was on my phone, maybe ‘cos it’s just a lowly Backflip (lol). That job I did myself.

    PS I still favor the quasi-open-market app approach favored by Google- in spite of all the danger- to Big Brother Apple’s policy of zealous scrutinization whenever someone submits a new iPhone app for approval. I’m old enough to choose my own apps, and am willing to take the blame for installing a bad one without checking it out first.

  41. Romano says:

    Hello together

    i got a HTC desire last november and i had every day alot of data been downloaded with the phone.
    I didnt do anything just loaded some APP’s up and tried them.
    On the end i had a download from 2 Gigabytes and i cost me 3000.- swiss francs!
    does anybody know about that problem?
    I didnt know if it was the download or the upload.

    Now i reinstalled everything on the phone again and have since then no problems anymore.

  42. sal says:

    How much is the cost?

  43. Harvey Lerner says:

    I have Lookout Premium on my Droid phone. Do I also a need a site on my computer as a starting point if I lose my phone? What is that site and how do I create an account there?

    • Amy says:

      @Harvey, thanks for reaching out. If you lose your phone you can log on to the internet and go to http://www.mylookoutdotcom. Select the “login” button and you will be prompted to enter the email you used to download Lookout to your phone and password. Once you enter the site, select “Missing Device” and you can “locate” your phone…Lookout will send you an email with your phone’s location pinpointed on a map. If you have any other questions, please contact us at support@mylookout[dot]com.

  44. ANDROYD27 says:

    When I go to “Managed Applications” on my android, I click the “all” tab and scroll down to the bottom, I see a process or app that does NOT have a “uninstall” option.

    Has anyone seen this app/function on your android got any idea what it is?

    投篮_LCD

    I have NO idea where it came from and have not installed any of the apps listed above. I am thinking it could be mal and from another app on the market not yet flagged….

  45. Brian says:

    @Androyd27, please install and use our DroidDream cleaner (http://ow.ly/4z09G or open the market on your device and search for ‘Lookout’) and check if it catches this. If not, please send me an email to support at mylookout dot com so we can work through this directly.

  46. GeorgeL says:

    Why is no one asking the REAL question?… Who is Droid/Google’s main competitor in the Mobile Apps market? Why is it that viruses/malware always become rampant in markets where Apple is competing? Has anyone ever considered that Apple/Jobs is paying individuals to write malware for the competition!?

    Think about it? I understand that Microsoft and the PC is a gargantuan target out there and many hackers would want to target “Goliath”…however, that should only meant that they would get the majority of malware attacks…not ALL! Hackers are largely platform independent and write malicious code for their own gratification. UNLESS they have a more appealing offer…

    Furthermore, the “Goliath” reasoning doesn’t fit the current mobile app market. At best Google and Apple share the top. In reality Apple is the current giant. Following the same reasoning, Apple should be the target now? WHY NOT… and don’t give me the same old tired crap about how solid the Apple platform is… i don’t care how ‘solid’ an application platform is, there are weaknesses that can be exploited or designed.

    THINK PEOPLE!

  47. […] Market’te 50′den fazla zararlı uygulamanın yakalandığını söyleyen MyLookout‘a bakılırsa Schouwenberg pek de haksız değil. Mobil güvenlik şirketi […]

  48. nikeshox says:

    I was happy to search out this web-site.I wanted to thank you for your time for this great learn!! I ACTUALLY certainly taking advantage of each little it all and I’ve got you book-marked to see fresh things you blog post.

  49. Keith says:

    I have a three day experiment. I install an app that I think could be nice and then after 3 days if I haven’t opened it again I remove it. It must not be that important. Of course this doesn’t go for all apps (nav applications, travel apps) but it generally seems to work for me.

  50. […] code into multiple apps and create variations of the original malware. In fact, variants of DroidDream accounted for more than 80 infected applications alone. Similar to DroidDream, the authors of […]

  51. Aca says:

    Whit wich antivirus l can clean my phone htc wildfire s of infected programs?
    Is this aplications barcode scanner (no Advanced Barcode Scanner) whic l find on market is virus? Please help. and l can see my watch on displey like before how can l fix that?? thanks . . .

    • Amy says:

      @Aca, thanks for reaching out. If you have Lookout downloaded on your device, the scanner will detect the apps with malware from the developers of DroidDream. If you have any other questions, please feel free to contact us our support team directly at: support[at]mylookout.com. Thank you!

  52. Hello author. Really liked your blog and especially this article. I raised his blog to my bookmarks. I learned many interesting things. Recommend to your friends on Facebook.

  53. I love to read the article, its pretty rich in information. I Suggest everyone to bookmark the site for further reading or RSS feeds.

  54. wow didn’t know there was malware for androids. Thanks for sharing this I will send it to all my friends so they will know about it too!

  55. Good information. Now i know where the problems are coming from. Thanks for this helpful post.

  56. Thanks for the good post i will share this and add it to my bookmarks!

  57. i will send this to all my friends i hate malware thanks for the good information!

  58. bryan says:

    Lookout, please review current apps and update.

  59. incasso says:

    Thanks for the information I found it to be very helpfull.

  60. Thanks, hate maleware. Will definitely ust it!

  61. Sled says:

    Photo Editor was detected by lookout as Malware on my phone but it’s unable to un-install the app. :(

  62. john says:

    yeah I have a quick question how do I remove malware of my phone from photo editor I have the AVG virus scan and that’s what it says photo editor

    • Meghan Kelly says:

      Hi John, sorry you’re having an issue! When Lookout sees a malicious app, we give you the option to remove that app immediately from your device. You can check out our app here: https://www.lookout.com/android

      I would otherwise recommend reaching out to AVG’s support staff!

Leave a comment